Moses 1 – Identity

We taught Moses 1 and used the text to identify where Moses learns his identity.  I asked the youth if they could think of a story, movie, or play where the character learns more about their identity and it changes their views on the world around them.  Many in my classes could relate with the movie Tangled, where the main character learns that her mother is evil and that she is not really her mother.

Many stories have the uncovering of their identity as a theme.  I like the Star Wars movies, which are rich in mythological symbols and meaning.  Whatever story you relate with in class, the point is that the youth need to realize that they are children of their Father in Heaven.  Once they really know this, it changes how they view the world around them.

Teachers for seminaries and institutes recently had the opportunity to hear from Elder Paul Johnson.  In his message he said something that resonated with me.  He said, “what I see depends on where I sit.”  This statement has many meanings for me personally, but in the context of Moses 1, Moses sees Satan for what he is because of the experiences that he has had with holiness and understanding how the Lord operates.

We had a great discussion in class about times when the young people in class saw things differently in their lives because their eyes were opened, either to their own personal experiences or through the experiences of those they love.  One particular comment stood out.  A student in class shared how her experience with Trek over the summer “changed not only my views of the pioneers and what they experienced, but changed my whole outlook on life.  I am forever changed through my experience with Trek.”  Asking this one question generated a tremendous discussion and an outpouring of the Spirit.  This was a great way to start this new year of seminary!

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About LDS Scripture Teachings

I write about ways scripture applies in our lives: LDSScriptureTeachings.org
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